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What To Do When You've Broken Your Leg?

If you have recently broken your leg, you may be wondering what the road to recovery looks like and how physiotherapy can help. A broken leg can be a painful and inconvenient injury, but with the right treatment and care, you can make a full recovery. In this blog, we will discuss what physiotherapy has to say about breaking your leg and how it can help you regain strength and mobility. Whether you are dealing with a simple fracture or a more complex injury, physiotherapy can play a crucial role in your recovery. Keep reading to learn more.



How do you know that you've broken your leg? Signs & Symptoms


There are several signs and symptoms that may indicate that you have broken your leg:

  1. Pain: A broken leg is usually accompanied by severe pain that may increase when you try to move the injured limb.

  2. Swelling: Swelling may occur around the injury site as a result of bleeding and inflammation.

  3. Bruising: Bruising may appear on the skin around the injury site as a result of bleeding under the skin.

  4. Deformity: A broken leg may cause the limb to appear deformed, such as a bent or twisted appearance.

  5. Difficulty moving: You may have difficulty moving or bearing weight on the injured limb.

  6. Numbness or tingling: You may experience numbness or tingling in the injured limb, especially if the injury is severe.

If you are experiencing any of these signs and symptoms, it is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible. A healthcare professional will be able to diagnose the injury and provide appropriate treatment.


Seeking Medical Attention


It is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible if you think you have broken your leg. A healthcare professional will be able to diagnose the injury and provide appropriate treatment, which may include setting the bone, wearing a cast, or using crutches. In some cases, a broken leg may require emergency treatment, especially if the injury is severe or if there is an open wound. If you are unable to move or are in severe pain, call 000 or ask someone nearby to call for you.


Do not try to diagnose or treat a broken leg on your own. It is important to receive proper medical care to ensure a successful recovery.


Treatment


Physiotherapy treatment for a broken leg will depend on the severity of the injury and the specific needs of the patient. Some common physiotherapy treatments for a broken leg may include:

  1. Pain management: Physiotherapists can help manage pain and discomfort by providing techniques such as ice therapy, heat therapy, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS).

  2. Range of motion exercises: Range of motion exercises can help maintain flexibility and prevent stiffness in the injured limb.

  3. Strength training: Once the bone has healed, physiotherapists can help patients regain strength in the injured limb through strength training exercises.

  4. Balance and coordination training: Balance and coordination training can help patients regain their ability to move safely and independently.

  5. Gait training: Gait training can help patients learn how to walk properly with the aid of crutches or other assistive devices.

  6. Education: Physiotherapists can provide education on how to manage the injury at home and prevent future injuries.

It is important to follow the treatment plan prescribed by your physiotherapist to ensure a successful recovery. They will work with you to develop a treatment plan that is tailored to your specific needs and goals.


Medication


It is possible that your healthcare provider may prescribe medication in addition to physiotherapy treatment for a broken leg. The type of medication prescribed will depend on the severity of the injury and the specific needs of the patient.

Some common medications that may be prescribed for a broken leg include:

  1. Pain medication: Pain medication, such as acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), can help manage pain and discomfort.

  2. Antibiotics: Antibiotics may be prescribed if there is an infection at the injury site.

  3. Blood thinners: Blood thinners may be prescribed to prevent blood clots from forming in the injured limb.

It is important to follow the instructions provided by your healthcare provider when taking any medication. Be sure to take the medication as directed and report any side effects to your healthcare provider.

Surgery

Surgery may be recommended in some cases of a broken leg, depending on the severity of the injury. The type of surgery that is recommended will depend on the specific needs of the patient.

Some common types of surgery for a broken leg include:

  1. Closed reduction: This type of surgery is used to set the broken bone back in place without making an incision.

  2. Open reduction: This type of surgery is used to set the broken bone back in place through an incision. It may be necessary if the bone is severely broken or if there is an infection at the injury site.

  3. Internal fixation: This type of surgery involves using metal screws, pins, or plates to hold the broken bone in place while it heals.

  4. External fixation: This type of surgery involves using a metal frame attached to the outside of the leg to hold the broken bone in place while it heals.

It is important to discuss the benefits and risks of surgery with your healthcare provider before making a decision. They will be able to provide more information on the specific type of surgery that is recommended and how it can help with your recovery.


In conclusion, a broken leg can be a painful and inconvenient injury, but with proper treatment and care, you can make a full recovery. Physiotherapy can play a crucial role in helping you regain strength and mobility in the injured limb. It is important to follow the treatment plan prescribed by your physiotherapist and seek medical attention as soon as possible if you think you have broken your leg. With the right support and guidance, you can get back on your feet and return to your normal activities.


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